The danger of “good enough”

There’s a saying out here in Silicon Valley (though I’m sure it’s more international than that). It goes like this:

Ideas are worth a dollar. All the money is in the execution.

In other words, the true money is found in how the idea is brought to life.

It should come as no surprise, therefore, that one of the tenets of the startup mentality is to get the idea going, to get a minimum viable product out the door.

And if this is where you are as a startup or innovator, then good enough sits squarely in your sweet spot.

But I have seen a nasty habit form from this mindset – in more than just tech companies.

I call it “good enough” thinking.

As in the revenue coming in is good enough. And the service going out the door is good enough. And the people, resources, and processes are good enough.

This isn’t necessarily bad/wrong, but it often leads to a problem that will actually stall the company – or worse.

You see, when “good enough” is the target, people get sloppy. They get complacent. They don’t invest in their own continuous improvement. Because people are – well – people. It’s in our nature to tune out the fringes and just focus on what is right in front of us. Our brains are literally wired to think this way, unless we force it to behave differently.

Consequently, we don’t truly invest in what it takes to reach the next level.

And once “good enough” thinking settles in as the norm, the entire organization is at risk.

Why?

Because people won’t know what they need to know. They will become so hyper-focused on what is in front of them that they will exclude paying attention to what they need to learn next. They will literally build a business engine that cannot scale or evolve.

And this is particularly painful when it comes to the Sales function.

As long as sales results are “good enough,” the risk of people not keeping their own continuous improvement up to date increases. People will not stay on top of how to reach the next level – because everyone is operating with “good enough” as the target. They simply aren’t looking at how to take things to the next level. They are not seeking new resources nor learning the skills that go with those resources. They are not challenging processes that limit performance. They are literally creating their own blind spots.

Mirror moment: Has your team been lulled into a state of “good enough”? Have you looked at how well your sales content, tools, and behaviors can scale?

If you see tension in cross-functional alignment, you have a “good enough” problem.

If you have a massive goal to reach and you have zero confidence that your current team can get there, you have a “good enough” problem.

Take time now, as the year wraps up, to do some proper evaluation of your sales health. Look to see where “good enough” thinking has created weakness. I recommend that you look at the following areas:

  • How do we recruit – do we hire well?
  • How do we onboard and develop – do we get people up to speed quickly and effectively?
  • How do we sell – do we ensure that our sellers are relevant to the customers they serve?
  • How do we manage – do we build high-performing teams with genuine bench strength?

Every one of these workstreams can stall your sales engine.

And when you see something that you know is broken, call it out. Do it now – before your customers evolve or your competitors surge or the market tanks or… You get the picture.

Because, as the old saying goes, what got you here won’t get you there.

I mua. Onward and upward.

By Tim Ohai

PS – If you or someone you know needs to get better performance from the sales team, let’s set up a conversation to talk about it. Get on my calendar here.

About the Author

4 practical ways to get “better” – Growth & Associates - December 4, 2018

[…] My blog last week apparently hit a nerve – a good one. It generated a lot of likes, shares, comments, and even new connections. […]

What’s the danger of doing it “wrong?” – Growth & Associates - December 11, 2018

[…] It matters because the people who work there, and the customers who do business there, should be creating and experiencing as much value as possible. That is what we call “good business.” It invests in itself and it ultimately invests in the community. But folks don’t always use that as their definition of success. They look at the money and think, “We are good enough.” […]

Comments are closed